Um, Hi! Remember me?

I’m the person who used to find time to blog about the various and sundry concerning Richard Armitage a few times a week.  Note to self – in future, avoid starting new parallel job while up to neck in work with existing job.  Never fear,  it will take me a few more weeks to even things out to level, but I’ll be back at full force soon.  In the meantime,  I’ve at least been able to lurk around here and there enough to have seen a whole slew of baguette puns centering around the latest from the newly crowned “Selfie King.”

I've got nothing that isn't half baked...

I’ve got nothing that isn’t half baked…mais ce sont quelques belles baguettes monsieur!

It kind of makes me wish that Richard Armitage could have a trip to Athens on deck so we might get to see something along the lines of this in a future tweet…

See - I even gave him a handy fig leaf just in case...    :D   (I'm sorry Apollo Belvedere!!)

See – I even gave him a handy fig leaf just in case… 😀  (I’m sorry Apollo Belvedere!!)

**In case you’re wondering, I have very little control over where my mind wanders on any given day…who knows what tomorrow might conjure!  😉  **

 

 

 

 

Richard Armitage – ὅ παῖς καλός

This is the first installment of what, I think, will become a regular feature here at Ancient Armitage…the καλός post.  A little bit of ancient pottery, a lot bit of the pulchritudinous Mr. Armitage.  Unlike the more analytical discussions, nothing connects Richard Armitage to the vases in question, except the wording of the inscriptions:  ὅ παῖς καλός

The generic inscription ὅ παῖς καλός  (ho pais kalos) “the boy is beautiful,” or a more specific variant of it, appears on hundreds of vases.  These καλός vases are a sub-genre of of Athenian pottery that were made between 550-450 BC and the vast majority of them are drinking cups like the ones below which were used at symposiaThe inscriptions always refer to someone as καλός, or beautiful.  Although some are dedicated to females, the greatest number celebrate the beauty of males. Their exact function and meaning are not well understood.  Some scholars suggest that they were a part of the homoerotic tradition of pederasty in classical Athens, others that they functioned as a sort of public relations ploy to increase the popularity of a particular youth, and therefore a particular family in the tightly knit Athenian social structure.  Their exact function and meaning continue to generate discussion after 2500 years.

Red Figure Kylix - by Euxitheos as potter and Oltos as painterPhoto: Direzione Generale per i Beni Archaeologici, Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali

Red Figure Kylix – by Euxitheos as potter and Oltos as painter
Photo: Direzione Generale per i Beni Archaeologici, Ministero per i Beni e le Attività Culturali

Interior - Discobolos Kleomelos KylixDepartment of Greek, Etruscan and Roman antiquities in the Louvre, Sully, first floor, room 43Photo Credit:  Wikimedia

Interior – Discobolos Kleomelos Kylix
Department of Greek, Etruscan and Roman antiquities in the Louvre, Sully, first floor, room 43
Photo Credit: Wikimedia

So without further ado, the καλός image that hit me in the solar plexus this week…. Oh, and of course there is Armitage as the “athelete” to link it to the image of the Discobolos (Discus Thrower) above  🙂

From the Facebook Page of Jamie Edwards - Magic 105.4

Table Football (or Foosball) Match
From the Facebook Page of Jamie Edwards – Magic 105.4